Creative Writing Characters

Creative Writing Characters-38
[*I use male pronouns inclusively here to represent both genders only to avoid the awkward repetition of he/she or him/her, fully recognizing that many lead characters are female and so are a majority of readers.] I’d love to impart some gem that would magically make you an expert at character development. Fellow Pantsers, don’t ignore or discount this training. As Stephen King advises, “Put interesting characters in difficult situations and write to find out what happens.” I identify as a Pantser, so I’m sympathetic if you can’t imagine creating a character and giving him a personal history before starting to write.

[*I use male pronouns inclusively here to represent both genders only to avoid the awkward repetition of he/she or him/her, fully recognizing that many lead characters are female and so are a majority of readers.] I’d love to impart some gem that would magically make you an expert at character development. Fellow Pantsers, don’t ignore or discount this training. As Stephen King advises, “Put interesting characters in difficult situations and write to find out what happens.” I identify as a Pantser, so I’m sympathetic if you can’t imagine creating a character and giving him a personal history before starting to write.

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If your character is bossy and stubborn, show that. Readers should also be able to readily identify characters other than the main ones. His dialogue is constantly described as “drawling.” Ex.

It’s helpful to pick two or three adjectives or traits to identify a character with—especially when you have a large cast of characters. Rubeus Hagrid – giant, bearded, carries a pink umbrella.

If you’re an Outliner (one who outlines your novel first), it’s time for character development, an endeavor not for wimps. Yes, even if your genre is Fantasy or Allegory or Futuristic. You cheat your readers when your lead character doesn’t develop and grow. To a new writer or an Outliner, it may sound exciting and dangerous to wade into a story counting on characters to emerge and take over. Frankly, Outliners have some advantages over Pantsers here.

Your character may even be a superhero, but he* must be real and knowable within your premise. They know a lot about their lead characters before they start writing.

Can you name the novels they come from and what they have in common?

The biggest mistake new writers make is introducing their main character too late.Creating believable and compelling characters is essential to much creative writing, from books and short stories, to biographies and poetry.The following exercises will help you create and develop your characters.Create a a list of a character’s basic information: name, age, nationality, religion, place of residence, place of origin, occupation, nicknames, etc.Such information is simple but can have important consequences.Readers need to feel something about your characters—curiosity, sympathy, animosity—anything but indifference.The best characters are ordinary people with exceptional qualities who do extraordinary things.You want something interesting and memorable, but not quirky or outrageous.Leave Blaze Starr and Goodnight Robicheaux to the melodramas.Rather than describing your character directly, use some of the information from the character profile to introduce your character to readers in an engaging way. The second example is a more effective and interesting way to develop the man’s character.It also lets readers experience his personality themselves and form their own ideas.

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